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21 May 20243 minute read

Understanding neurodiversity in the workplace

Facilitator: Dr Judith Mohring

21 May 2024, 09:00 – 10:00 BST

This webinar is hosted as part of WIN (What In-house lawyers Need) and has been created around the feedback of our global community of in-house lawyers. WIN addresses the commercial and personal aspects of working as an in-house lawyer regardless of your location or seniority level. Register to join WIN to ensure you receive future invitations directly to your inbox and view this year's other webinars here.

Organisations are increasingly aware of the need to understand neurodiversity. Workplaces benefit from valuing these differences, leading to a broader talent pool, better employee retention and improved employee satisfaction.

During this webinar, Dr Mohring will offer practical tips and advice for neurodivergent people and colleagues. She will also introduce the concept of Neurodiversity through explaining different patterns and exploring how these can be a strength or weakness in different work situations. Through anonymised case studies of neurodivergent lawyers she has worked with, Dr Mohring will demonstrate how they used communication to overcome their areas of weakness and play to their strengths.

This webinar will cover:

  • What does being neurodivergent mean?
  • Why does neurodiversity matter in a business context?
  • What are the common ways in which people are neurodivergent?
    • Autism
    • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
    • Dyslexia and friends
  • What can workplaces do to support colleagues?
  • How improving understanding and adaptations for the neurodiverse benefits a business and its people

Speaker

Judith Mohring

Dr Judith Mohring

Dr Judith Mohring is a consultant psychiatrist with 25 years’ experience in clinical and organisational practice. Judith trained as a coach with coaching development in 2008 and has used her coaching skills in clinical and business settings since then. She combines her clinical expertise in neurodiversity with her lived experience as a neurodivergent person from a neurodivergent family.
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