Canadian Employment News Series June 2017

Canadian Employment News Series

Employment Alert

What happens when federal insolvency laws and provincial labour laws collide? What steps have been taken by the Alberta government to modernize its labour laws? Does providing a negative employee reference constitute defamation? How has social media affected the employment relationship? We explore these topics in the June 2017 edition of the Canadian Employment News Series.

In this issue

  • When federal insolvency laws and provincial labour laws collide
    12 JUN 2017
    Canadian Employment News Series

    The intersection between insolvency law and labour law has long created a struggle between balancing the rights of employees and maintaining a mechanism for restructuring or liquidating distressed companies. The general principle of paramountcy lies in the background of this balancing act – federal insolvency law will usually prevail where provincial labour law is in conflict with it.

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  • Alberta updates labour laws with amendments to the Labour Relations Code
    12 JUN 2017
    Canadian Employment News Series

    Alberta’s Labour Relations Code (the “Code”) was last updated in 1988, and with a new provincial government formed in 2015, it should have come as no surprise that a review of Alberta’s labour laws would occur. Between March 13 and April 18, 2017, Albertans were able to provide input on revising the Code.

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  • Negative employee reference given honestly and in good faith does not constitute defamation, Ontario court finds
    12 JUN 2017

    While many employers now opt to simply confirm when a past employee worked for them, the court’s decision in Papp v. Stokes provides important takeaways for employers who provide more substantive job references.

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  • Employee misconduct and social media
    12 JUN 2017

    As technology continues to blur the line between personal and professional life, employers increasingly find themselves dealing with the impact of social media on the employment relationship. Not only can social media activity provide evidence of employee misconduct outside the workplace, it can also constitute grounds for termination in and of itself.

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